Calgary, AB,
08
June
2015
|
21:00
America/Denver

Citizens’ Input Wanted to Define Crowchild Trail Study Goals

The City of Calgary is conducting a new transportation study for Crowchild Trail from 24 Avenue N.W. to 17 Avenue S.W. The study will identify short-, medium- and long-terms plans for Crowchild Trail to accommodate future growth, and improve travel along and across the corridor.

Throughout June and July, Calgarians are invited to provide input through workshops, study area tours, and an online questionnaire on the goals of a future Crowchild Trail. The City will also be at various community events to talk to people about Crowchild Trail.

“We’re in phase two of a new six-phase study process. We want to hear from Calgarians about how Crowchild Trail is important to their commute, to their neighbourhood, to area businesses and destinations, and to Calgary’s transportation network,” says Feisal Lakha, senior transportation engineer at The City.

The new Crowchild Trail Study has a six-phase process and is expected to be complete by end of 2016. The City recently wrapped up phase one of the study, which included working with a group of 18 Calgarians to develop an engagement program for the study. Calgarians will have multiple opportunities to provide input during each phase of the study.

From now until end of July, The City is gathering input to confirm study goals, which will help guide the development and evaluation of design concepts as the study progresses.

“Whether you live or work close to Crowchild, or use it to get around Calgary, I encourage you to get involved now so your input can be used to inform the remainder of the study,” says Lakha.

For more information about the Crowchild Trail Study and how to get involved, visit www.calgary.ca/crowchild.

About the Crowchild Trail Study
The new Crowchild Trail Study is made up of six phases—engagement process design, confirming project goals, concept identification, concept evaluation, concept selection and recommendation and finally reporting and completion.

In phase one of the study, The City established an 18-person Engagement Design Team to answer the question “How do we have the most effective conversation possible about the Crowchild Trail Study?” Participants included nine members from bordering communities and nine members from the general public.

An online questionnaire was available for Calgarians to provide input on how they would like to be engaged in the Crowchild Trail Study. More than 500 Calgarians responded.

Results from the online questionnaire were shared with the Engagement Design Team, who participated in three workshops to share their ideas about engaging Calgarians in the study. The outcome is an engagement process for Phases two to six of the study that will provide multiple opportunities for all stakeholders—bordering communities, residents, business owners, landowners, road users, major institutions, emergency response agencies—to provide meaningful input into the study.

For updates on the Crowchild Trail Study visit www.calgary.ca/crowchild.

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