Calgary,
20
June
2018
|
20:45
America/Denver

Chief David Crowchild Memorial and Aboriginal Youth Achievement Awards honour Shawna Morning Bull and Wacey Little Light

In time for National Indigenous Peoples Day and Aboriginal Awareness Week in Calgary, today in the Municipal Plaza Atrium, an award ceremony was held to announce and celebrate the winners of both the Chief David Crowchild Memorial and the Aboriginal Youth Achievement Awards.

Shawna Morning Bull was awarded the Chief David Crowchild Memorial Award for her dedication to improving the lives and economy of First Nations communities. She works on projects, programs and services with Community Futures Treaty Seven, Piikani Resource Development and the Calgary Chamber of Commerce Indigenous Opportunities Sub-Committee.

“I am extremely honored to be receiving such an important award as the Chief David Crowchild Award. I am earnestly grateful for this recognition I have received for my work in the indigenous and non-indigenous community of and the surrounding communities of Mohkinstsis (Elbow/Where the river meets),” says Morning Bull, a member of the Piikani First Nation located in southern Alberta. “I am very humbled to my peers that they feel I deserve this honour and thankful for their ongoing encouragement for the work I love to do.”

Wacey Little Light was awarded the Aboriginal Youth Achievement Award. Born and raised in the Siksika Nation, Wacey is a Mount Royal University student majoring in Ecotourism and Outdoor leadership. Wacey's grandparents always taught him the importance of community.

“This award means a lot to me,” says Little Light. “I hope it can provide a stronger foundation for me to be a contributing member in the communities that I’m a part of, including The City of Calgary, The Siksika Nation, and The Iniskim Centre at Mount Royal University.”

“Shawna and Wacey represent the very best of citizenship in our community, and I’m so proud we could honour them today,” said Mayor Naheed Nenshi. “Their leadership, especially in this time of reconciliation, helps us create a shared future of opportunity and prosperity for all.”

Each year, the Chief David Crowchild Memorial Award is presented to honour the efforts and contributions of a person, group or organization who have created bridges of understanding through cross cultural experiences between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal cultures within the City of Calgary, created within Canadian society an understanding of the uniqueness and value of Aboriginal culture, and encouraged or supported Aboriginal people in the areas of education, employment and training.

Awarded annually, the Aboriginal Youth Achievement Award recognizes Aboriginal Youth (aged 14-24) who demonstrate leadership in the community, display a strong desire and commitment to achieve educational goals, support and encourage others to continue in their academic endeavors and encourage and participate in cross-cultural activities. The award is open to all Aboriginal youth, including First Nations status and non-status, Métis and Inuit. Award recipients will be given the opportunity to represent Aboriginal youth as a member of the Calgary Aboriginal Urban Affairs Committee (CAUAC).